committed to conserving...™

Why are lion-tailed macaques rare?

R. KRISHNAMANI & AJITH KUMAR

In: Indian Hotspots: Vertebrate Faunal Diversity, Conservation and Management. Vol. 1. Sivaperuman, C. and Venkataraman, K. (Eds.). Springer Nature, Singapore. Pp 285-294.

2018

Abstract

The intermittent distribution of various animal and plant species in the world, has long been at the core of conservation biology and community ecology. It is therefore vital to know the processes and factors that impact rarities and endemism in the plant and animal world. The mechanism that regulates this rarity and limits a species’ distribution and abundance is still not fully understood. We are now beginning to understand that certain plants play an important role during periods of food scarcity. Generally, the plants that sustain animals during periods of food shortage are themselves not abundant (relative to other food trees), and during periods of food abundance, these plants may not be eaten at all. But Cullenia and Ficus species are the most sought after by the lion-tailed macaques and are important food resources throughout the year. Here we show how these much-favored food trees govern the distribution and very existence of this primate.

 
Why are lion-tailed macaques rare?
Download file pdfs/indian_hotspots_1_book_2018.pdf (613kb)
Already downloaded 29 times

hortus

leafindicus

malabaricus

 

by HENDRIK VAN RHEEDE

The Hortus Indicus Malabaricus comprises 12 volumes of about 500 pages each, with 794 copper plate engravings. The first of the 12 volumes of the book was published in 1678, and the last in 1693. It is believed to be the earliest comprehensive printed work on the flora of southern India, Asia and the tropics.

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™

the flora

leafsylvatica

for southern india

 

by Col. RH BEDDOME

Col. Richard Henry Beddome was a British military officer and naturalist in India. His publications include The Flora Sylvatica for Southern India, 1869–73; Ferns of Southern India, 1873; Ferns of British India, 1876; Forester's Manual of Botany for Southern India, 1869–74; Icones Plantarum Indies Orientalis, 1874.

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™

plants of the

leafcoast

of coromandel

 

by W ROXBURGH

William Roxburgh was a Scottish surgeon and botanist who worked extensively in India, describing species and working on economic botany. He is known as the founding father of Indian botany. In 1795 Plants of the coast of Coromandel was published in 3 volumes. He was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society.

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™

the fauna of british

mothindia

including ... Moths

 

by Sir GF HAMPSON

Sir George Francis Hampson was an English entomologist. Hampson travelled to India to become a tea-planter in the Nilgiri Hills, where he became interested in moths and butterflies. He then commenced work on The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma: Moths (4 volumes 1892-1896).

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™