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Understanding geophagy in animals: Standard procedures for sampling soils

WILLIAM C. MAHANEY & R. KRISHNAMANI

JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ECOLOGY 29(7) : 1503-1523.

2001

Abstract

Geophagy or soil ingestion is a multidisciplinary phenomenon that has attracted the attention of many researchers in recent years; who have sought to understand why a large number of animals consume natural earths. To ?nd out why animals ingest soils, it is of paramount importance to establish standard methods to analyze comestible soil. Researchers have used different methods to examine soils ingested by animals, often with incomplete or inconclusive results. To make meaningful comparisons among studies, it is necessary to perfect research designs and establish standard methods to evaluate and analyze geophagy in animals.

 
Understanding geophagy in animals: Standard procedures for sampling soils
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hortus

leafindicus

malabaricus

 

by HENDRIK VAN RHEEDE

The Hortus Indicus Malabaricus comprises 12 volumes of about 500 pages each, with 794 copper plate engravings. The first of the 12 volumes of the book was published in 1678, and the last in 1693. It is believed to be the earliest comprehensive printed work on the flora of southern India, Asia and the tropics.

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the flora

leafsylvatica

for southern india

 

by Col. RH BEDDOME

Col. Richard Henry Beddome was a British military officer and naturalist in India. His publications include The Flora Sylvatica for Southern India, 1869–73; Ferns of Southern India, 1873; Ferns of British India, 1876; Forester's Manual of Botany for Southern India, 1869–74; Icones Plantarum Indies Orientalis, 1874.

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plants of the

leafcoast

of coromandel

 

by W ROXBURGH

William Roxburgh was a Scottish surgeon and botanist who worked extensively in India, describing species and working on economic botany. He is known as the founding father of Indian botany. In 1795 Plants of the coast of Coromandel was published in 3 volumes. He was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society.

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the fauna of british

mothindia

including ... Moths

 

by Sir GF HAMPSON

Sir George Francis Hampson was an English entomologist. Hampson travelled to India to become a tea-planter in the Nilgiri Hills, where he became interested in moths and butterflies. He then commenced work on The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma: Moths (4 volumes 1892-1896).

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