planting a lot of trees isn’t enough ...

trees green photo

Conservationists are understandably eager to harness this enthusiasm, of planting 1 trillion trees, to combat climate change. But will this solve the issue ...

More details...

© Society for Science
 

2021 human-driven heat wave ...

pacific heatwave map

Climate change made the deadly heat wave that struck the northwestern United States and western Canada in late June 2021 at least 150 times more likely ...

More details...

© Society for Science
 

only 3% of Earth’s land is intact ...

areas intact

Only about 20-40% of land habitats on Earth remain free from obvious human incursions such as roads, cities or light pollution, but only 3% are intact since A.D. 1500 ...

More details...

© Society for Science
 

International Year of Fruits and VegetablesThe Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, launched the International Year of Fruits and Vegetables on the 15th of December 2020, with an appeal to improve healthy and sustainable food production through innovation and technology and to reduce food loss and waste.

hortus

leafindicus

malabaricus

 

by HENDRIK VAN RHEEDE

The Hortus Indicus Malabaricus comprises 12 volumes of about 500 pages each, with 794 copper plate engravings. The first of the 12 volumes of the book was published in 1678, and the last in 1693. It is believed to be the earliest comprehensive printed work on the flora of southern India, Asia and the tropics.

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™

the flora

leafsylvatica

for southern india

 

by Col. RH BEDDOME

Col. Richard Henry Beddome was a British military officer and naturalist in India. His publications include The Flora Sylvatica for Southern India, 1869–73; Ferns of Southern India, 1873; Ferns of British India, 1876; Forester's Manual of Botany for Southern India, 1869–74; Icones Plantarum Indies Orientalis, 1874.

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™

plants of the

leafcoast

of coromandel

 

by W ROXBURGH

William Roxburgh was a Scottish surgeon and botanist who worked extensively in India, describing species and working on economic botany. He is known as the founding father of Indian botany. In 1795 Plants of the coast of Coromandel was published in 3 volumes. He was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society.

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™

the fauna of british

mothindia

including ... Moths

 

by Sir GF HAMPSON

Sir George Francis Hampson was an English entomologist. Hampson travelled to India to become a tea-planter in the Nilgiri Hills, where he became interested in moths and butterflies. He then commenced work on The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma: Moths (4 volumes 1892-1896).

Available HERE for one's perusal.

 

committed to conserving...™